Niah National Park

Sarawak

Located in Miri, Sarawak, Niah National Park is one of the most important archaeological sites in the world, as some of the oldest human remains in Southeast Asia were found there. Covering an area of 3,138 hectares of forest and limestone karst areas, it was designated as a national park by the Sarawak government in 1974

 

In 1958, a modern human skull, believed to be about 40,000 years old, was discovered at the West Mouth of the Great Cave, along with other relics like tools and cooking utensils made of bone, stone or clay, suggesting a long period of settlement dating back to the palaeolithic era.

Boasting an immense quantity of prehistoric remains and various sets of caves, the national park is a perfect spot for nature lovers and history enthusiasts. The Traders’ Cave exhibits the remnants of huts that were used as shelters for birds’ nest collectors. The Great Cave, located about 3.5 kilometres from the Park Headquarters, can be easily access via a plank walkway and is enclosed on both sides by giant tapang trees.

Boasting an immense quantity of prehistoric remains and various sets of caves, the national park is a perfect spot for nature lovers and history enthusiasts. The Traders’ Cave exhibits the remnants of huts that were used as shelters for birds’ nest collectors. The Great Cave, located about 3.5 kilometres from the Park Headquarters, can be easily access via a plank walkway and is enclosed on both sides by giant tapang trees.

At 60 metres high and 250 metres wide, the West Mouth of the Great Cave boasts one of the world’s most spectacular cave entrance. A passage at the back of the Great Cave leads to a large chamber named Padang, in which rays of sunlight stream into the gaping hole above onto the peculiar rock formations, eliciting a breathtaking experience, and makes a unique ambience for photography.

A walk through the pitch-black Moon Cave will lead to the Painted Cave, which provides a sneak peek into the life of the past. The walls of the chamber are covered with ancient paintings portraying animals living in the forest. It is also believed to be a burial site as the remnants of boat-shaped coffins were found on the cave floor.

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